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it seems to me, and maybe i will direct us to the navy, because the numbers matter in the navy. obviously it is a lot of great people. we have half as many chips as we had 30 years ago. some people say that that is okay because they are technologically advanced we don't need as many. which i am sure that that is true in part. but it does seem like numbers matter to a certain extent. that is the thrust of my question. we are asking you, the navy, to do a lot of things. to go and chase the pirates off the coast of samarra. we are asking you to send humanitarian aid from the caribbean and citizen destroyers and we will need to keep an eye on china as well. it seems like the world has not gotten safer. the question to the navy and the other services, three simple questions. how do you decide the priorities that you are asked by the combatant commanders. these different missions. how do you make that decision in terms i priority when you only have limited access? also, are there areas of the world where cousins will be decreased because of this? and also, most importantly, what impact does thi
have come back to the market. can you tell us a little bit more about the structural economic reforms. particularly repairing the banking system, which i feel is the exemption of growth. >> yes, two years ago when the administration was elected, it actually lasted 250,000 jobs for the two years prior to that. reputation is in shreds around the world. our banks are dysfunctional. there is a complete sense of hopelessness and despair and disillusionment. now, gordon was elected with a very keen mind. we have a strategy and a plan that works. the banks are being recapitalize and restructured and have been back in the market as this program began in 2013. there are double-digit figures and our people have had to take really serious challenges. his government made really serious decisions or if it is an example of the government works and understands the patience of people, putting up with these changes in the greater picture of things. now, we expect to do better. but we cannot do without the collaboration of the committee of the colleagues in order to do that in 2013, and example of the
and our great leader, tom vilsack has an opportunity to share with us visions for were going in the second term. it seems like a sequester come to sequester come to sequester and that certainly does weigh heavily on our shoulders, but nevertheless come were applied rumor going to do some incredibly great things in the second turned and i'm sure he's very excited to share that with you. i also want to recognize that we have a lot of young people in the audience from the outlook forum student diversity program, now in its seventh year. 20 undergraduates and for the first time, 10 graduate students are here to gain insights into food monoculture. so be sure to seek them out during the breaks. congratulate them for being here, mentor them over the course of a couple of days. that would be great. i know how these people are because i have an alumnus of this program who works in my office and these are the people who are going to beat american agriculture in the future. many thanks to our program partner, university of maryland eastern shore and the sponsors to make this program possible, chs, f
heightened security risk. and i think it's time for us to do a check on whether or not we should in fact be relying on in that local militia were contractors. >> senator, let me just commend you for the work you've been doing with regards to these kind of contract and the quality of individuals that are involved. .. to do what is inherit a government function. it's almost like a hit brick wall every i time talk about this. why is it it has to be a contract function. why can't we use the best trained military in the world to protect our most valued assets in our most dangerous places? >> i mean, i think the reality just speaking with regards to my old agency we are deployed in so many areas you can't expect the military to pop up there and provide that kind of protection. they have to get security on side and get from the very best people they can contract with. that's become the reality we're dealing with. >> because the need to integrate to the community and therefore if you have military it stands out. i can see that particularly under the intelligence agency. for embassies, it
i would estimate probably 40% of our ships are manufactured in the u.s. but we also come into your question, many facts are some in europe, facilities and japan were global manufacturing. >> to be a very small percentage right now. >> 10%? >> significantly less. >> are major components to your industry engaged in manufacturing these types of things in china. >> their other part that manufacture. we appreciate that investment. it says here we have $409 in this type of research going on. does that $400 billion annually, does that calculate with individual inventors put into the mix, or they just not part of the calculation? >> are probably not going to be significant percentage as measured by dollars but about 60% would come from private companies than 40% of the federal funded. >> were talking about private inventors and their impact on new discoveries. how is she placed them in terms of government programs coming up with something new, corporations coming up with something new versus the individual inventor community coming up with something new. >> if you look at the types of recr
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-reformed over the last two years, but especially last year and u.s. senator lieberman, senator collins and senator brown has supposed reform bill. a lot of people said you couldn't do that come us to thank you for your hard work. been assuming that mr. donahoe, you would agree if the house had taken that the senate bill were passed a bill similar to that and got to the present economy would not have recently made this amount on the saturday delivery that the bill the senate has had provisions in the two make sure this wouldn't happen for a couple years. do you agree with? >> would need to move as quickly as we can canonically changing delivery schedules. sometimes people think that's not a lot money, but to us it's a substantial amount. we need to move on package delivery and not so are proposing. >> i don't want to bring up a touchy subject, but let me go ahead and do it. and that is your legal authority for ending saturday delivery. i know that in the appropriation bills over the years we've put provisions in the appropriations bill that basically say you have to deliver on saturdays
? you reminded us at the very beginning of his talk about george herbert walker bush been a prudent, careful, cautious political leader. and then he tells as that he had a vision for a new world oil. he was ready to risk an enormous amount because he saw the stakes and is so much bigger than saddam hussein. >> general house? didn't we expect saddam hussein hussein -- but were casualties? can you believe were ready to throw the dice. that ambassador napper misunderstanding the man for whom this library is respected? >> go ahead, sir. [laughter] >> can i interject if i may? >> we should let the kool-aid vendor defend himself. >> i just want to point out if only one of the three of us agrees on this panel, i'm still batting .333 enacted into the hall of fame. [laughter] >> i guess i'm at least partly persuaded by the argument. i do think notwithstanding president bush's reputation for person that he also did have a broader vision about the way he wanted the world to look after his administration. and i do think the iraqi use of the crisis for us to accomplish its objectives sort of vio
issue he brought up was the issue of a new war on poverty. and now joining us, one of the 84 new members of congress is tony car dane use of california. who's seat did you take? >> they changed the lines around in california, and i put my name for a seat there that was no incumbent. so i was able to win outright. here i am. >> what is your background? >> i -- well, i started off as an engineer and i went to owning my own business and joined the state legislature in california for six years. been on the city council for ten of los angeles and now i'm a member of congress as of january of this year. >> what did the president say that resonated with you tonight? >> what i like the most about what he said when it came to immigration reform, he basically said let's get this done now. i think we have a window of opportunity of bipartisan cooperation for republicans and democrats by large agree we need to do something. let's hope we can work on the -- working on out of the senate and in our house and get something comprehensive to the president right away. >> what was the experience lik
was some low threshold employer match and allowing an employer to raise that match if they want to us in employment incentives so it might provide one and a half%. so you could answer it as an employment incentives. have you thought about if we move ahead in this area, what should the contribution rate be. >> that's an excellent question i encourage the committee to think not in terms of a single default contribution rate, but a differentiated alternative. and senator alexander was talking about the small restaurant chain, my guess is employees are younger and for a ban in our contribution rate might make sense. whereas a look at someone who's a bit older and this is their full-time job, the default contribution rate might be substantially higher. we know from investor psychology that individuals think in terms of raw numbers, multiple sub type, 5% of pay, 10% of pay. desired benchmarks that individuals can get their hands around and might be worth taking about something mahler. 5% for younger workers to something higher, maybe 10% for lower workers. >> were trying to make this as sim
started in terms of the freedom struggle. i think in some ways we mislead ourselves when we use the term civil rights movement because of that had been the gold goal in 1965 the civil rights agenda had been achieved. we had the civil rights act of 1964 in and the voting rights act of 1965 so if that had been the goal martin luther king would have said i'm going to retire and go to a college and be a campus minister. stokely carmichael would have said i have achieved my goal. none of the said that. none of the people that i knew because all the stuff that the goal was much more radical in some ways than that. get. >> host: why? >> guest: economic change, empowering the black community. that was at the root of the black power movement and black power for black people. using the rights that have been gained to actually bring about concrete changes. i think for many of us we saw 1965 is the beginning, not the end. now we have -- and now the question becomes what he going to do with that? how are you going to -- the black community by that time is 100 years in restrictions and discrimination
difficult to negotiate a treaty, but to agree on legal principles such as a country can use lethal force against a terrorist in another country whose threat and attack if that country is unwilling or unable to prevent that thread. in most cases around the world, the countries are able to prevent that thread. they can arrest the person. but in four or five countries, yemen, somalia, pakistan want to get countries around the world to acknowledge the united states right under international law to use force to kill someone in another country who is posing a threat when it can't be addressed in another way. we can get there, but they're just not going to agree to our position unless we go through aggressive international legal diplomacy. it's a great kind of questions. >> and they are the likely position that some would take the point to this hearing and the debates in this country? or have a hard enough time coming to terms with this idea that the very earliest stages of the potential that drones will offer. there have been a hard nut time coming to terms under our constitution and now we'll
the marketing campaign around acknowledging that the pizza they used to be selling wasn't up to the standards that they wanted to have. i talked to the senior people at come come dominoes and they said we want to rebuild trust with and they saw a broader trust problem. people responded positively and dominoes had a good run. i'm seeing this with other companies talking about and thinking about how do we build trust. how do we rebuild trust with our workers, you know, this also when you look at the trust surveys that are done, there's ban big break down in trust towards big corporations and in particular and top managers at big corporations. and so, you know, you're starting to see some discussions at some of these big corporations like dominoes about the recognition of a problem and, you know, strategies for trying to rebuild that. >> host: in pennsylvania, gerald, republican line. >> caller: good morning. i have a quick comment and a question. first of all, he said he would rather face a standing army than have a central bank. i don't trust anything the government says and the numbers they p
and they want to thank them and all of you for joining us. we have an incredible turnout here in washington d.c. and i like to acknowledge your guess in the studios of distance-learning. and the administration which showed it a lot in the white house. dr. ruby doe from hs, lillian sparks administration are native americans and also representatives of key federal agencies that include the department of agriculture, congress, homeland security, interior, justice, labor and epa. we are delighted to be joined by congresswoman betty: in the senate committee of indian affairs and staff from senators begich, heitkamp and countless office. were honored to be joined by the head councilman, joe garcia who's also on our board as well as larry thompson on her word and vice president from the round valley chad from the national museum of american and, byron dorgon from the native american years, clara pratt and the navajo nation washington office, kiki carroll from the southern and eastern tribes, chris metcalf in the alaska native corporation and chairman ernie stevens, who by the way has never missed t
appreciate the same be done for all of us. it's not an absence of commitment, to try close because pakistan remains firmly committed to fighting, combating extremism and manifestations because u.s. is not something we could walk away from. it's a clear and present danger to our society and way of life. and when you say what are the worries? one of the worries is that there may be security vacuums after the straw down because many of the timelines spoken of in terms of transitions and sectarian of a possible negotiated peace are all right now timelines and we look at them with hope and we have been strenuous in moving all of our resources, clinical, to not make an otherwise to the task of whatever negotiated settlement the united states and afghanistan are seeking in this moment of challenging transition. >> termer cubby, david word, and emily jake. >> ambassador, thank you for being here. two questions. one, hamid karzai and david cameron had a meeting to spend a six-month deadline on tax of the taliban. two ambition i pakistan was a political party functioning in society? and two, to think
what did you learn? you think it's so important for us to know. he turns a weakness in the strength. don't give an inch. turnaround. is that the politics of personal destruction. certainly a politics of personal one upmanship. there was a role for wit and trauma. final ," off the top of my head, he love to ski. he also at one point visited the soviet union and at the national review group that got together. most of them went and i think it was the winter of 75 or 76. they don't have the right to grant permission. i'm not going to ask communist permission for anything, even to visit their country. he told me, i once said that i would no more go to the soviet union on vacation then i would if hitler had permitted it and skied in the austrian alps to our world war ii. he said buckley took some exception to that. it is a rather specialized point of view. may have handicapped me a bit, but i stuck with the. [applause] >> books about the financial industry in crisis. starting in a p.m. eastern, the personal finance industry. at nine kate institute president john allison argues that govern
is productivity and that sounds great because that's what the u.s. needs to get out of this issue. the problem is who is going to be the buyer and how is that going to work out with the currency wars? at some point we ask for, have a weak dollar, which active in the next country can buy the same machines and shop in barcelona, see the local market. are we looking at that end of the equation in terms of the offtake as they say in biofuels? >> well, there's a famous economist in the 1800s called jean baptiste say that man creates its own demand and that is certainly true, particularly in this case. as companies become more perfect is come at cheaper the kind cheaper. so we don't have the worry about somehow people will want things. we have about $45,000 in this country and i guarantee you the vast majority people would rather have a median income of $200,000 for 400,000 or a million and that's just us. in terms of currency, currency is a problem. fundamentally we cannot become our project even innovative is a country, were not going to get access to these markets. why is the german philosophy as
issues for very long time. we are very pleased to have you with us. >> thank you very much. it would be frightening to put me back in award. [laughter] no fear there. [laughter] thank you very much, ed. thank you for inviting me to be with you this morning. it is an interesting set of questions. what i would like to do is to go a little bit deeper under the challenges. jonathan did a terrific job of touching on some of that was. certainly, juliette cubanski davis a terrific structure of the program. notwithstanding its desire not to talk politics, the reality is that medicare is very much caught up in the discussions of the day. it has been tremendously successful in providing coverage to the elderly in this country and the disabled. certainly the 50 million people in 2012 that were covered by the program. it has achieved a great many terrific outcomes, some that were reflected in the job at kaiser has done. the program has been in variation, as jonathan pointed out, in terms of the differences around the country and the utilization of services, and we have word for many years about
communities, the commission recommends that the rural housing programs remain at the u.s. department of agriculture, one agency dedicated to and present in rural america. he lived there, they know what the problems are, and the people there trust them. we also recommend extending the current definition of rural areas, to ensure that rural communities continue to have access to the system that rural housing programs can provide. we also urge that they be carefully examined and the operations be examined for modification. these programs are currently underfunded despite an impressive track record. they need, for example, a slightly more increased application process and the underwriting as well. we know it is a difficult time to talk about spending. these recommendations will be no small sum to jump. counseling and stable rule housing are important elements. with that, i turn it over to my good friend whom i was named by "the wall street journal" many years ago as the odd couple because of our ability to work across the aisle. when he was secretary and i was with him. [applause] >> tha
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19